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Researchers develop new Multiferroic material to make computers 100 times more energy efficient

Researchers develop new Multiferroic material to make computers 100 times more energy efficient

With an aim of making computers more power efficient, researchers have designed a new material – magnetoelectric multiferroic that consumes nearly 100 times less power than the traditional computer elements. This new breakthrough technology can solve the power management issues of modern day computing devices and can make them last up to several days or even months on a single charge.

Researchers at the University of Michigan have harnessed the power of planar rumpling. The new material is conductive and magnetic at room temperatures. By combining individual layers of atom, the material produces a thin film having magnetic polarity which can be flipped from positive to negative or the other way around with small electricity pulses.

According to the team that engineered the device, it will be used in future devices to store 0 and 1 in digital form. The multiferroic devices use very little electrical pulses to operate while traditional devices use constant electricity flow. This way, its developer claim that the device can save power up to 100 times. In addition, the new material stores data even when the power is off.

“Electronics are the fastest-growing consumer of energy worldwide,” said one of the study authors, Ramamoorthy Ramesh from Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in the US. “Today, about five per cent of our total global energy consumption is spent on electronics, and that’s projected to grow to 40-50 percent by 2030 if we continue at the current pace and if there are no major advances in the field that lead to lower energy consumption,” Ramesh said.

“We were essentially spray painting individual atoms of iron, lutetium and oxygen to achieve a new atomic structure that exhibits stronger magnetic properties,” said Darrell Schlom, a materials science and engineering professor at Cornell.

 

Source: Tecake

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